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myampgoesto11:

Photographic soap bubble studies by Santiago Betancur Z  that look like planets  

Photographer and painter Santiago Betancur Z explores the intersection between science and abstract art in his photographic studies of bubbles, as well as producing life-size figure painting. In his photographs and video recordings, Betancur Z captures imagery of soap bubbles against dark backgrounds, showcasing the random kaleidoscopic color and light effects produced by the delicate spheres, and the chance allusions that occur in their surfaces

Watch this beautiful collaboration between Santiago Betancur Z and musician Julian De La Chica

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fun fact, photographs of the bottoms of really old and crusty pots and pans look like way cool planets too

deducecanoe:

cross-connect:

Artist Loren Stump specializes in a form of glasswork called murrine, where rods of glass are melted together and then sliced to reveal elaborate patterns and forms. While the murrina process appeared in the Mideast some 4,000 years ago, Stump has perfected his own technique over the past 35 years to the point where he can now layer entire portraits and paintings in glass before slicing them to see the final results.

Posted to Cross Connect by Sunil

WHAT THIS IS CRAZY HOW DOESS YOUR BRAIN EVEN WORK THAT YOU CAN MAKE THIS WORK AND MAKE IT SO INTRICATE AND BEAUTIFUL. AND WAY TO GO MIDDLE EAST FOR STARTING THIS THING

viivus:

I made a walkthrough of my process for drawing faceted stones! Judging by the timestamps from the screenshots I took, drawing this one stone took an hour and three minutes, although I know I went and checked tumblr a couple times while I was working, so let’s just call it an hour.

Now MISCELLANEOUS NOTES

  • This walkthrough assumes you already know how to use layer masks, the clone stamp, and the lasso tool. There’s also one part where I didn’t label it, but I inverted the selection so I could keep my lines consistent. It’s in the third image.
  • Unfortunately I can’t really help with colour choice and the actual colouring of the pinwheel shape that makes up the back facets, but you can kind of see that I tended to colour with lines that cut across the facets and and kept the outer parts of the facets darker. It would probably be best to find a reference to work from!
  • This particular cut of stone is called the ‘brilliant’ cut.
  • There’s actually a lot of internal reflection business that goes on in a stone, but I elected to ingore all of it since at a distance you can’t really tell anyway.

now GO FORTH AND DAZZLE YOUR FRIENDS WITH YOUR SPARKLE

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